Posts Tagged ‘Grains’

What do low-tar cigarettes, low-fat yogurt and healthy whole grains have in common?

Followers of the Undoctored and Wheat Belly books and lifestyle understand a basic truth in logic: Just because something is less bad does not necessarily make it good.

Low-tar cigarettes have less of the toxic compounds that leave the brown residue–“tar”–after tobacco is burned, but smoking low-tar cigarettes does not reduce risk for lung cancer, mouth/throat cancer, or cardiovascular disease.

Premarin, whole grains, and why you can’t believe headlines

Imagine you have a friend named Justin. He is a schoolteacher. Honest, hardworking, doesn’t smoke, rarely drinks alcohol, sleeps well, doesn’t take drugs, shows up at work every day. He has also chosen to be vegetarian.

Another friend of yours, an auto mechanic named Tommy, eats fast food, loves fried chicken, drinks too much beer on the weekends, likes to drive fast cars, and sometimes gets into legal tangles. He smokes cigarettes, though has limited it to only half-a-pack per day. Late weekends, some weekday nights, sleep cut short to just two or three hours. Tommy is not a vegetarian, but likes his burgers rare with a big side of French fries and a can or two of Coca Cola.

Why grains make you fat

How is it that a blueberry muffin or onion bagel can trigger weight gain? Why do people who exercise, soccer Moms, and other everyday people who cut their fat and eat more “healthy whole grains” get fatter and fatter? And why weight gain specifically in the abdomen, the deep visceral fat that I call a “wheat belly,” that is inflammatory, worsens insulin resistance and blood sugars, disrupts hormones like testosterone and estrogens, and is associated with greater risk for heart disease, cancer, and Alzheimer’s?

Watch Out for Hidden Sources of Grains— What to Look for When Reading Labels

You need to be careful when you shop, as grains, especially wheat and corn, can be found in an incredible variety of forms in processed foods—hidden as additives, thickeners, coatings, or cheap “bulk.” Avoiding foods containing hidden grains can be difficult because wheat and corn, in particular, come in some tough-to-recognize names. You will be shocked at how many processed food products contain grains—frozen dinners, bottled salad dressings, dry salad dressing mixes, seasoning mixes, canned soups, instant soup mixes, candy bars, licorice— the majority of foods filling the aisles in supermarkets.